In this section, I am providing general information - combination of a glossary, listing of great personalities, locations & geographical landmarks, history - in general any subject related to India. I have gathered the information from various sources - books, magazines, internet, word of mouth.

General information about India - R


Rangoli
March 2012
Rangoli are a symbol of auspiciousness (Rang - colour).  It is Hindu belief that that the geometrical patterns & designs applied with rice flour at the entrance to a home invites Goddess lakshmi into the household, and drives away the evil spirits.  Images are drawn either freehand or connecting rows of dots.  Colours are then applied to the various motifs making up the design.  Colour powders or flowers are used for this purpose.

The designs applied at the front entrance & pooja rooms using white rice flour or sand stone is known as Kolams in the South.  There are specific kolams attributed to the various deities.
Samples of kolams & Rangolis
Kolams are known by different names in different parts of India. Hase in Karnataka, muggulu in Andrapradesh, chowkpurna in Uttar Pradesh, alpana in Bengal and Assam, and rangoli in Gujarat and Maharashtra.
- Information about different names in different parts of India from http://www.auroville.org/environment/villages/vill_kolam.htm


Rishis
The word Rishis itself means 'Mantra-drashta', seer of a mantra
Source - Excerpt from All About Hinduism by Sri Swami Sivananda http://www.vmission.org.in/vedanta/shastras/vedas.htm


Rivers
The rivers of India can be classified into four groups viz.,
Himalayan rivers,
Deccan rivers,
Coastal rivers, and
Rivers of the inland drainage basin.

The Himalayan Rivers are formed by melting snow and glaciers and therefore, continuously flow throughout the year. During the monsoon months, Himalayas receive very heavy rainfall and rivers swell, causing frequent floods. The Deccan Rivers on the other hand are rain fed and therefore fluctuate in volume. Many of these are non-perennial. The Coastal streams, especially on the west coast are short in length and have limited catchment's areas. Most of them are non-perennial. The streams of inland drainage basin of western Rajasthan are few. Most of them are of an ephemeral character.

The main Himalayan river systems are those of the Indus and the Ganga-Brahmaputra-Meghna system.

The Indus, which is one of the great rivers of the world, rises near Mansarovar in Tibet and flows through India, and thereafter through Pakistan, and finally falls in the Arabian Sea near Karachi. Its important tributaries flowing in Indian Territory are the Sutlej (originating in Tibet), the Beas, the Ravi, the Chenab, and the Jhelum.

The Ganga-Brahmaputra-Meghna is another important system of which the principal sub-basins are those of Bhagirathi and the Alaknanda, which join at Dev Prayag to form the Ganga. It traverses through Uttarakhand, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, and West Bengal. Below Rajmahal hills, the Bhagirathi, which used to be the main course in the past, takes off, while the Padma continues eastward and enters Bangladesh. The Yamuna, the Ramganga, the Ghaghra, the Gandak, the Kosi, the Mahananda and the Sone are the important tributaries of the Ganga. Rivers Chambal and Betwa are the important sub-tributaries, which join Yamuna before it meets the Ganga. The Padma and the Brahmaputra join inside Bangladesh, and continue to flow as the Padma or Ganga.

The Brahmaputra rises in Tibet, where it is known as Tsangpo and runs a long distance till it crosses over into India in Arunachal Pradesh under the name of Dihang. Near Passighat, the Debang and Lohit join the river Brahmaputra and the combined river runs all along the Assam in a narrow valley. It crosses into Bangladesh downstream of Dhubri.
The principal tributaries of Brahmaputra in India are the Subansiri, Jia Bhareli, Dhansiri, Puthimari, Pagladiya and the Manas. The Brahmaputra in Bangladesh receives the flow of Tista, etc., and finally falls into Ganga. The Barak River, the Head stream of Meghna, rises in the hills in Manipur. The important tributaries of the river are Makku, Trang, Tuivai, Jiri, Sonai, Rukni, Katakhal, Dhaleswari, Langachini, Maduva and Jatinga. Barak continues in Bangladesh till the combined Ganga—Brahmaputra join it near Bhairab Bazar.

In the Deccan region, most of the major river systems flowing generally in east direction fall into Bay of Bengal. The major east flowing rivers are Godavari, Krishna, Cauvery, Mahanadi, etc. Narmada and Tapti are major West flowing rivers.

The Godavari in the southern Peninsula has the second largest river basin covering 10 per cent of the area of India. Next to it is the Krishna basin in the region, while the Mahanadi has the third largest basin. The basin of the Narmada in the uplands of the Deccan, flowing to the Arabian Sea, and of the Kaveri in the south, falling into the Bay of Bengal are about the same size, though with different character and shape.

There are numerous coastal rivers, which are comparatively small. While only handful of such rivers drain into the sea near the delta of east cost, there are as many as 600 such rivers on the west coast.

A few rivers in Rajasthan do not drain into the sea. They drain into salt lakes and get lost in sand with no outlet to sea. Besides these, there are the Desert Rivers which flow for some distance and are lost in the desert. These are Luni and others such as, Machhu, Rupen, Saraswati, Banas and Ghaggar.
Source - http://india.gov.in/knowindia/rivers.php

Rupee
The Reserve Bank manages currency in India.The Reserve Bank derives its role in currency management on the basis of the Reserve Bank of India Act, 1934.
For complete information about the Indian rupee notes
Source - http://www.paisaboltahai.rbi.org.in/about_us.htm

Languages in the reverse of the Indian Rupee
Assameese
Bengali
Gujarati
Kannada
Kashmiri
Konkani
Malayalam
Marathi
Nepali
Oriya
Punjabi
Sanskrit
Tamil
Telugu
Urudu
Source - http://banks-india.com/banking-system/different-languages-on-rupee-bank-notes/



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